School Trip

the-met-roger-b

PHOTO PROMPT © Roger Bultot

“How about this one!”  

“I don’t care mom” Marie’s boredom is obvious as they peer in the glass at the beautiful cartouche in gold and silver.

“We can have one made with your name on it. It will be here in time for your birthday!”

“Fine! Whatever! Can we go now?”

Marie touches the necklace around her neck as she recalls the memory of the Egyptian exhibit. The school trip had been a nightmare and the museum was just one more boring stop.

What she wouldn’t give to go back to The Met and see it through her mother’s eye.

100 words

This is my entry for Friday Fictioneers June 6, 2018 hosted by our lovely Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. It is a wonderful challenge. Please follow the link to give it a try!! 🙂

 

Friday Fictioners button

If you are wondering what a cartouche is, you can follow the links in the story. I have included the definition as well as what a piece of jewelry would look like. They are beautiful and unique and I have one in gold.

70 thoughts on “School Trip

    • Thanks Tracey… that is kind of how I feel also. Even though I still have both of my parents. I went to a funeral this morning of a friend’s dad. Very sudden and not expected. I have called my dad every day for the last 4 days with one excuse or another. He doesn’t know about my friend’s dad. But it doesn’t matter. I am just glad I can hear his voice for now 🙂

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  1. This story corresponds so much to a book I just finished reading – Pretending to Dance – by Diane Chamberlain. Every other chapter is written from the protagonist’s 14-year-old POV, and the other chapters from her POV as a 37-year-old. Yes, so many of us look back and think, ‘if only I’d understood more back then and been nicer to our parents.’ Great job with this, Courtney.

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    • Thanks Pamela… this was loosely based on a school trip I took with my daughter and her choir to NYC. We did go to The Met but the cool Egyptian exhibit we saw was actually in New Orleans and she and I both have cartouche with our names embossed on them. I think we are all guilty of taking time for granted though and do not appreciate what we have. 😉

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  2. Such a touching reminder that we never get back those times we had together, and never get to correct our past actions — including all those things we failed to do when we had the chance. I am lucky that my parents are still around, and that I recovered from adolescence and have hopefully made it up to them by now.

    Funny that you mention the Egyptian exhibit, as I am just this afternoon making plans to go see the big King Tut exhibit in LA!

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      • I am super excited about the Tut exhibit! I go to all the Egyptian exhibits I can find, and went to a smaller Tut exhibit that was all replicas, but this is supposed to be pretty extensive. Can’t wait!

        Liked by 1 person

      • perhaps this quote from gibran can help:

        Your children are not your children.
        They are the sons and daughters of Life’s longing for itself.
        They come through you but not from you,
        And though they are with you yet they belong not to you.

        You may give them your love but not your thoughts,
        For they have their own thoughts.
        You may house their bodies but not their souls,
        For their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow,
        which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams.
        You may strive to be like them,
        but seek not to make them like you.
        For life goes not backward nor tarries with yesterday.

        You are the bows from which your children
        as living arrows are sent forth.
        The archer sees the mark upon the path of the infinite,
        and He bends you with His might
        that His arrows may go swift and far.
        Let your bending in the archer’s hand be for gladness;
        For even as He loves the arrow that flies,
        so He loves also the bow that is stable.

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  3. And so it goes in most families. We so want to our kids to appreciate what we are sharing with them and to often they realise it too late…
    Beautifully done, Courtney

    Liked by 1 person

  4. It would be so great if one can see from other’s point of view as well. Especially their parents. I love my parents but I do feel sometimes I do not enjoy crucial moments with they just because I’m lost in my mind.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. You handle the memory with a very light touch, using dialogue to make it come alive, and then you capture Marie’s wistful emotion to colour her memory of the school trip. Nice writing, Courtney!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. My Dad used to say, “Kids make you pay for your raising.” In our teen years, we know so much more than any adult, especially our parents. Fortunately, our parents become a whole lot wiser by the time we’re twenty-five or thirty. Funny how that works.

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  7. At sixteen, I coveted a turquoise ring my mother owned. That summer she, my dad and I took a road trip together ~ groan, where were my sisters!? The wind constantly blew – New Mexico style. We stopped at a roadside shop where my parents got out, saying, “Let’s stop here and take a look.” What? I thought. The wind will blow my hair around. Still, I got out and trudged inside. Turns out it was the shop where my mother bought her ring and they let me pick out any ring I wanted. I felt like a schlepp. Thanks, really, for that memory. Great story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Jan. It isn’t hard to think back to those years and have many regrets. I am sorry you have lost your mom. My mom is still here but that doesn’t take away the things I wish I could change…
      Thank you for stopping by! ❤

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